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How Tutoring Works
Jon Ellis from Tutor Hub talks about what to expect from using Private Tutors and more importantly why home tutoring works...
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"Schools are not known for being designed for privacy. At home, student and tutor can opt for as quiet or as dynamic an experience as they wish."
If you are considering hiring a tutor for your child or you are an adult student seeking extra help with a subject, home tutoring may be the way to go. This article looks into why home tutoring works.

So what can a student expect to get from home tutoring?

One-to-one attention:
Some children and adults find it hard to concentrate in a busy classroom with plenty of distractions. Schools are not known for being designed for privacy. At home, student and tutor can opt for as quiet or as dynamic and experience as they wish.

Time and pace:
At a student's home, a tutor can cater the lesson to their student's abilities and needs. This is in stark contrast to group classes in classrooms, where specific objectives are set and students are expected to comply with them.

Adapted to your learning style:
It's about what works best for the student. For example, some tutors may hold the lesson outdoors or ask students to take exercise between learning sessions, to encourage memory retention and interest. Some tutors also use tools like music in subjects like foreign language learning; a student is much more likely to relax and sing and dance to a tune from the comfort of their own home.

So why is it that some students need tutoring?

Well there can be a variety of issues at play, that mean that one to one tutoring is needed. Home is the ideal place to make a student feel comfortable enough to admit they are having difficulty with one area of a subject or that they have not completely understood a key concept you may need to go over again.
Some may be uncomfortable working in a group situation owing to issues like bullying, lack of trust or a lack of confidence in one's own academic ability. Home is the ideal venue in which to remove all the barriers they often feel they have to put up in typical classroom.

So how does home tutoring work?

Making the most of the week:
Home tutoring is very convenient for parents, particularly if they have to ferry their kids around the rest of the week. With a tutor in their home, parents can relax knowing that their children are receiving one on one support, at their own pace.

Getting to know the student:
One of the best ways for tutors to truly know their student is by observing them in their home environment. They can view how home and social relationships affect the way the student approaches their studies and tackle issues like shyness, a lack of concentration or boredom in a much more effective way. Observing their student interacting with their siblings can also give them a invaluable insight on tactics that work with them (Humour? Wit? Intellectual reasoning?). The key to being a really good tutor is to create a highly personalised learning session for their student.

Encouraging higher learning skills: The buzzword in secondary and tertiary institutions these days is 'critical thinking': encouraging students to think more profoundly and responsibly about topics and to encourage practices like asking open-ended questions and those which point out illogical assumptions. Home tutoring provides students withe the opportunity to discuss issues broadly, talk about issues that ignite and engage them.

Helping with homework:A home tutor can help the student with a particularly difficult piece of homework or essay to write. Targeted help in this way can address learning issues head-on.

Life advice:
Being in a student's home can help the tutor correct any bad habits that are getting in the way of a student's academic success. Issues can come up, including sleep timetables, frequency of exercise and possible conditions that may be interfering with a student's ability to concentrate and apply themselves (such as depression, anxiety, etc.). A tutor who is lucky enough to establish rapport with his student is also likely to have the sufficient degree of influence to enable him/her to suggest positive changes that will improve a student's self-esteem, endurance and concentration.

In this article, we have tried to summarise what you can expect from home tutoring, why students need it and how it works. If it sounds like the right thing to do, why not give it a try?
Contact the Tutor Hub here>

Article TUTOR HUB









"...some tutors may hold the lesson outdoors or ask students to take exercise between learning sessions, to encourage memory retention and interest."
















"Why use Private Tutors? - Some may be uncomfortable working in a group situation owing to issues like bullying, lack of trust or a lack of confidence in one's own academic ability."

















Critical thinking can be key..

"The buzzword in secondary and tertiary institutions these days is 'critical thinking'..."